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Lung Cancer News

Tuesday, November 08, 2005

Yahoo! Alerts
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Missing protein may hold lung cancer key
Reuters via Yahoo! News Tue, 08 Nov 2005 10:03 AM PST
A single protein may hold the key to turning the tide on lung cancer -- still the world's biggest cancer killer -- research published on Tuesday showed.

Missing protein may hold lung cancer key -research
Reuters Tue, 08 Nov 2005 10:03 AM PST
Researchers at Vanderbilt University in Nashville found that type 2 receptors for Transforming Growth Factor-b -- a family of proteins that controls key functions such as cell growth and death -- were missing in non-small cell lung cancer victims.

Race can affect decision about lung cancer treatment
EurekAlert! Mon, 07 Nov 2005 2:24 PM PST
Race may play a role in whether a patient accepts surgical treatment for lung cancer. A study in the November issue of CHEST, the peer-reviewed journal of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), found that blacks with lung cancer declined surgery at a higher rate than whites, leading researchers to believe that blacks may be misinformed about the effects of lung cancer surgery.

Race Can Affect Decision About Lung Cancer Treatment
RedNova Mon, 07 Nov 2005 4:27 PM PST
NORTHBROOK, Ill., Nov. 7 /PRNewswire/ -- Race may play a role in whether a patient accepts surgical treatment for lung cancer.

How to prevent and treat lung cancer
Medical News Today Mon, 07 Nov 2005 11:07 PM PST
Since smoking became popular in America in the 1930s, lung cancer rates have continued to climb. Today, it is still the leading cause of cancer-related deaths, with totals more than the other five leading cancers combined.

FDA OKs New Pancreatic Cancer Treatment
WebMD Mon, 07 Nov 2005 12:26 PM PST
The FDA has approved the use of the lung cancer drug Tarceva to treat advanced pancreatic cancer.

FDA Approves Drug for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer
American Cancer Society via Yahoo! News Mon, 07 Nov 2005 4:00 PM PST
On November 3, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the combination of Tarceva (erlotinib) and Gemzar (gemcitabine) as first-line treatment of patients with locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer who had not already undergone chemotherapy treatment. Gemzar alone has been the most commonly used treatment in this situation .

ABC launches anti-smoking ad campaign
Reuters via Yahoo! News Tue, 08 Nov 2005 2:15 AM PST
It isn't just ABC News that's being enlisted in the battle against smoking and lung cancer in the Quit to Live series, which began airing this month on "World News Tonight."

Lung Experts for COPD Day, Nov 16
Newswise Tue, 08 Nov 2005 9:24 AM PST
Experts from the American Thoracic Society, the world's leading association of lung specialists, able to talk to reporters about Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, the 4th leading killer of people worldwide, according to WHO.





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Sunday, November 06, 2005

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Hope over cheek lung cancer test
BBC News Sat, 05 Nov 2005 6:42 PM PST
A simple test of facial cheek cells can help determine people at high-risk of lung cancer, a study says.

Lung-sparing treatment for cancer proving effective
Medical News Today Sat, 05 Nov 2005 4:09 PM PST
Lung cancer patients with extenuating health problems may have an alternative to traditional radiation therapy through a lung-sparing procedure pioneered at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

Mutations in the BRAF gene predict sensitivity to a novel class of cancer drugs
EurekAlert! Sun, 06 Nov 2005 10:16 AM PST
NEW YORK, November 6, 2005 – A team of researchers led by scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center have discovered that a new class of drugs -- now in early stage clinical trials -- work best in patients with mutations in the BRAF gene.

Clinton says mom's breast cancer and his health issues made him eager to help others
Houston Chronicle Sat, 05 Nov 2005 11:49 PM PST
Adding breast cancer to the list of health causes he champions, former President Bill Clinton is establishing a fund in honor of his mother, who died of the disease in 1994.

How good are alternative tobacco products?
Medical News Today Sat, 05 Nov 2005 9:37 PM PST
According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, nearly one-fourth of Americans are smokers. That's more than 60 million people who are at increased for lung cancer , the leading cause of cancer-related deaths nationwide.

Cancers in Malaysia
The Star Online Sat, 05 Nov 2005 6:30 PM PST
With such an emphasis on cancer recently, I was wondering what the commonest cancers are in Malaysia.

New strides being made in chemoprevention
Medical News Today Sat, 05 Nov 2005 9:07 PM PST
There are a number of things people are told to do to prevent cancer - eat well, exercise, don't smoke. However, despite these obvious preventive measures, many individuals will develop the disease.

Health notes
Baltimore Sun Sun, 06 Nov 2005 6:59 AM PST

Health news
Chicago Sun-Times Sun, 06 Nov 2005 2:38 AM PST
Price increases for popular brand-name prescription drugs rose at twice the general rate of inflation for the year ending June 30, though the gap narrowed a bit, the AARP said.

Cetuximab clinical trial programme accelerates
Medical News Today Sat, 05 Nov 2005 4:07 PM PST
The clinical trial programme for cetuximab (Erbitux) is gathering pace with new studies underway in a broad range of malignancies, according to presentations at the 13th Annual European Conference on Clinical Oncology, held this week in Paris, France.





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Saturday, November 05, 2005

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More Women Than Men Survive Lung Cancer
Fox News Fri, 04 Nov 2005 1:57 PM PST
Women may be more likely to survive lung cancer than men, new research shows.

Smoking's Impact on Health Is Not Limited to Lung Cancer
Discovery Health Fri, 04 Nov 2005 12:13 PM PST
Most smokers are aware of specific risks associated with smoking — cancer, emphysema, bronchitis — but smoking impacts nearly all aspects of your health.

Tarceva receives approval for pancreatic cancer in the US
PharmaBiz Fri, 04 Nov 2005 7:42 PM PST
Tarceva (erlotinib), the only EGFR-inhibitor to have shown a survival benefit in lung cancer, will now benefit patients with advanced pancreatic cancer following FDA approval in the United States.

New, stauncher targeted drug delivery system for cancer patients
Medical News Today Sat, 05 Nov 2005 1:07 AM PST
Prostate, breast and other cancer patients may be offered a new, stauncher targeted drug delivery system to treat their diseases in the next decade.

Many mistakenly think nicotine causes cancer, rather than the smoke
Medical News Today Fri, 04 Nov 2005 11:07 PM PST
Women who smoke are more concerned about their habit and their ability to quit than men, yet both genders appear misinformed about smoking and its link to cancer.

When a somebody has cancer, what are the cancer risks for the rest of the family?
Medical News Today Fri, 04 Nov 2005 9:07 PM PST
After a person is diagnosed with cancer, increased surveillance among their family members may result in the earlier detection of asymptomatic familial cancers.

Giant Retailer, Cancer Researcher to Develop Oral Health Products
RedNova Sat, 05 Nov 2005 2:16 AM PST
By Anne Belli, Houston Chronicle Nov.

Battle With Insurers Over Payout Threat
RedNova Sat, 05 Nov 2005 4:16 AM PST
By Liz Hands Hundreds of workers in the North-East are fighting an insurance industry bid to scrap compensation payouts for an asbestos-related disease.

AD/HD genetic risks assessed
American Psychological Association Sat, 05 Nov 2005 9:05 AM PST
Existing evidence suggests genetic risk factors are critical to the development of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Women More Prone to Asthma Than Men
Health Scout Fri, 04 Nov 2005 5:13 PM PST
FRIDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Hormone fluctuations may explain why women have higher asthma rates than men, according to reports presented Friday at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, in Anaheim, Calif.





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Thursday, November 03, 2005

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Tarceva OKd for new use by FDA Lung cancer drug from Genentech to treat pancreas
San Francisco Chronicle Thu, 03 Nov 2005 8:08 AM PST
Genentech Inc. and its partner OSI Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Wednesday that their lung cancer drug Tarceva received Food and Drug Administration approval for use in pancreatic cancer, the most deadly type of tumor.

Women show a better response to lung cancer therapy, resulting in better survival rates
News-Medical-Net Thu, 03 Nov 2005 6:25 AM PST
However, in untreated patients, women also had a 21 percent decreased risk of death as compared with men, leading researchers to believe lung cancer in women has a different biologic behavior and natural history than in men.

Lung cancer drug approved for treating pancreatic cancer
News-Medical-Net Thu, 03 Nov 2005 5:10 AM PST
Genentech and OSI Pharmaceuticals have announced that U.S. regulators have approved their lung cancer drug Tarceva for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

Dentists could help detect lung cancer - Inner cheek cells can be used
Medical News Today Wed, 02 Nov 2005 4:07 PM PST
Simple lung cancer test may be used in dentist offices A novel test for lung cancer uses inner cheek cells to identify the disease in high-risk patients.

Women with lung cancer tend to live longer than men, regardless of treatment
Medical News Today Wed, 02 Nov 2005 4:11 PM PST
Regardless of what type of treatment they get, when it comes to early-stage lung cancer women survive for longer than men, say researchers at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York.

Cancer support group meets up
The Scotsman Thu, 03 Nov 2005 4:23 AM PST
EDINBURGH and Lothian Prostate Cancer Support Group is meeting at Maggie's Centre, Western General Hospital, tonight at 7pm.

DiagnoCure signs license agreement with Genzyme for lung cancer associated genes
PR Newswire via Yahoo! Finance Wed, 02 Nov 2005 10:34 AM PST
DiagnoCure Inc. (TSX: CUR -

Richard G. Pestell Named Director of Jefferson's Kimmel Cancer Center
Newswise Thu, 03 Nov 2005 5:23 AM PST
Richard G. Pestell, M.D., Ph.D., an internationally renowned expert in oncology and endocrinology, has been named director of the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson in Philadelphia. With this appointment, the cancer programs at Jefferson are being restructured and the role of the cancer center director expanded.

New targeted cancer drug delivery system
News-Medical-Net Thu, 03 Nov 2005 5:54 AM PST
Prostate, breast and other cancer patients may be offered a new, stauncher targeted drug delivery system to treat their diseases in the next decade.

Study examines cancer risks after cancer diagnosis in family
News-Medical-Net Thu, 03 Nov 2005 5:24 AM PST
After a person is diagnosed with cancer, increased surveillance among their family members may result in the earlier detection of asymptomatic familial cancers.





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Tuesday, November 01, 2005

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New Technology Boosts Lung Cancer Treatment
HealthDay via Yahoo! News Tue, 01 Nov 2005 6:01 AM PST
TUESDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- A new lung-sparing procedure may provide an alternative to traditional radiation treatments for lung cancer patients with health problems that make them poor candidates for surgery.

Lung cancer signs awareness call
BBC News Tue, 01 Nov 2005 4:12 AM PST
Campaigners are aiming to raise awareness of the early signs of lung cancer, which kills 92 people each day.

Lung cancer survival better in women
EurekAlert! Tue, 01 Nov 2005 7:39 AM PST
Women with lung cancer are living longer than men, even when the disease is untreated.

Cheek Swab Helps Spot Early Lung Cancer
HealthDay via Yahoo! News Mon, 31 Oct 2005 1:02 PM PST
MONDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- One of the reasons lung cancer is so deadly is that it is often detected too late for treatments to be effective.

Simple lung cancer test may be used in dentist offices
Cancerfacts.com Tue, 01 Nov 2005 0:43 AM PST
MONTREAL – Oct. 31, 2005 – One day people at high risk of lung cancer might scrape the inside of the cheek with a small wooden spatula similar to a tongue depressor and have the collected cells analyzed for lung cancer, a new study shows.

Vital: SPOTTING LUNG CANCER EARLY COULD MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE
RedNova Tue, 01 Nov 2005 6:05 AM PST
LUNG cancer kills 92 people a day but more lives could be saved if the disease was detected earlier, according to research by two charities.

Untreated, Women with Lung Cancer Live Longer than Men
Newswise Tue, 01 Nov 2005 8:24 AM PST
Women with lung cancer are living longer than men, even when the disease is untreated, shows a new study.

Lung-sparing treatment for cancer proving effective
EurekAlert! Mon, 31 Oct 2005 9:46 PM PST
INDIANAPOLIS – Lung cancer patients with extenuating health problems may have an alternative to traditional radiation therapy through a lung-sparing procedure pioneered at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

New Lung Cancer Test Targets Cheek Cells
WebMD Mon, 31 Oct 2005 2:11 PM PST
A new lung cancer test could help detect the disease in its early stages, scientists from Canada report.

Buccal mucosa may help test for lung cancer
News-Medical-Net Tue, 01 Nov 2005 3:10 AM PST
In a new study presented at CHEST 2005, the 71st annual international scientific assembly of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), scientists found that buccal mucosa, or cells scraped from the inner part of the cheek, may contain information that separates patients with lung cancer from high-risk negatives





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Friday, October 28, 2005

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Some Vegetables May Protect Against Lung Cancer
HealthDay via Yahoo! News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 4:02 PM PDT
THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- People with a specific genetic susceptibility to lung cancer may be able to trim their risk by eating vegetables from the cabbage family, new research suggests.

Iressa Doesn't Improve Odds Against Lung Cancer
HealthDay via Yahoo! News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 4:02 PM PDT
THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- The drug Iressa (gefitinib) doesn't significantly improve survival for people with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), says a study in this week's issue of The Lancet.

Broccoli May Protect Some Against Lung Cancer
WebMD Fri, 28 Oct 2005 6:41 AM PDT
People genetically at risk for lung cancer may benefit from crunching on some cruciferous vegetables.

Cabbages 'cut lung cancer risks'
BBC News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 4:27 PM PDT
Eating vegetables from the cabbage family could cut some people's risk of lung cancer, scientists say.

Cabbage 'Stops Lung Cancer'
RedNova Fri, 28 Oct 2005 5:34 AM PDT
Scientists have found that a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables " cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts " protects against lung cancer. However, the protective effect only works in people who have inactive versions of one or both of two specific genes " about half of the population.

Cabbages can reduce lung cancer risk
Hindustan Times Fri, 28 Oct 2005 3:50 AM PDT
Eating cabbages at least once a week can reduce the risk of lung cancer for people with a certain genetic make up, says a study.

Cabbage fans less likely to develop lung cancer, suggests study
Food Navigator Fri, 28 Oct 2005 2:50 AM PDT
28/10/2005 - Eating cabbage and other vegetables from the same family could help reduce the risk of lung cancer for some people with a particular genetic make-up, suggests new research.

Cabbage and broccoli 'can help prevent lung cancer'
Independent Thu, 27 Oct 2005 4:32 PM PDT
Eat your veg - it could be the next best thing to giving up smoking, because scientists have found that a diet rich in cruciferous vegetables - cabbage, broccoli and Brussels sprouts - protects against lung cancer.

Gene Discovery Could Broaden Cancer Research
HealthDay via Yahoo! News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 11:02 AM PDT
THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers have stumbled across an unexpected genetic phenomenon in prostate cancer -- a discovery that could change conventional thinking on breast, colon and lung malignancies as well.

Cabbages Hit Cancer
RedNova Fri, 28 Oct 2005 5:31 AM PDT
EATING cabbage can help prevent lung cancer for people with the right genes, say researchers. So can broccoli, sprouts and other veg in the family. They are rich in isothiocyanates, known to help prevent the disease.





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Thursday, October 27, 2005

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Biomira Inc. reports Q3 loss of $5.5M, promising results from cancer vaccine trial
Canadian Press via Yahoo! News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 6:08 AM PDT
EDMONTON (CP) - Higher research and development spending drove cancer vaccine developer Biomira Inc.'s third-quarter loss up to $5.48 million from a year-ago $4.8 million, the Edmonton-based company said Thursday.

Mammograms, Drug Therapy Led to Plunge in Breast Cancer Deaths
Bloomberg.com Thu, 27 Oct 2005 6:07 AM PDT
Oct. 27 (Bloomberg) -- Mammograms and potent new drugs contributed to a drop in mortality rates from breast cancer in the final 25 years of the 20th century, a study in today's New England Journal of Medicine found.

Lippman recognized for discoveries in cancer prevention
EurekAlert! Thu, 27 Oct 2005 8:01 AM PDT
PHILADELPHIA – Scott M. Lippman, M.D., chairman of the Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention and Ellen F. Knisely Distinguished Chair at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, has been selected to receive the fourth annual American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-Cancer Research and Prevention Foundation (CRPF) Award for Excellence in Cancer Prevention Research.

Why More Women Are Surviving Breast Cancer
WebMD Wed, 26 Oct 2005 4:26 PM PDT
More U.S. women are surviving breast cancer than a generation ago, and researchers say improved screening and treatments have played a key role.

Screening, Therapies Behind Drop in Breast Cancer Death Rates
Health Scout Wed, 26 Oct 2005 4:43 PM PDT
Chemotherapy and tamoxifen are responsible for more than half of the drop, a new study finds.

Preventing Breast Cancer Is a Natural
ThirdAge Thu, 27 Oct 2005 0:33 AM PDT
Big ones. Small ones. Droopy ones. Damaged ones. As a plastic surgeon in Cincinnati, Ohio, Dr. Christine Horner beheld every kind of breast. Yet she knew little about how to keep them healthy.

Scientists Ready to 'Map' Gene Variations, Diseases
RedNova Thu, 27 Oct 2005 4:18 AM PDT
By Steve Sternberg A global team of scientists announced Wednesday that researchers have created a map of human genetic variations that will enable them to begin to explain for the first time why some people get common diseases, such as cancer and heart disease, and why others do not.

Smoking debate blankets Britain
Reuters via Yahoo! News Thu, 27 Oct 2005 9:02 AM PDT
Britain unveiled new anti-smoking laws on Thursday but failed to impose a total ban on lighting up in workplaces after a heated debate in prime Minister Tony Blair's Labour party.

Chewing Gum Speeds Surgery Recovery
Health Scout Thu, 27 Oct 2005 7:43 AM PDT
THURSDAY, Oct. 27 (HealthDay News) -- New research has given doctors and their patients something to chew on: Patients who use chewing gum have shorter hospital stays after laparoscopic colon surgery than those who don't.

Turmeric: a hot topic in fighting disease
Newsday.com Thu, 27 Oct 2005 9:24 AM PDT
WASHINGTON - Turmeric, the Asian spice that makes curry yellow, not to mention French's mustard and Hindu priests' robes, has yet another life: It's a promising potential weapon against several cancers, Alzheimer's disease, cystic fibrosis, psoriasis and other diseases.





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